Archive for Medicaid

 

Federal Health Policy Update for Tuesday, September 21

The following is the latest health policy news from the federal government as of 2:45 p.m. on Tuesday, September 21.  Some of the language used below is taken directly from government documents.

Provider Relief Fund

  • HHS has updated its Provider Relief Fund reporting portal’s frequently asked questions.  Find the updated FAQ here.
  • HHS has published a Provider Relief Fund reporting portal user guide.  Find the guide here.

The White House

Department of Health and Human Services

COVID-19

  • The federal government has responded to recent increases in COVID-19 cases by assuming control of the distribution of monoclonal antibodies used to treat the virus.  Learn more from the announcement of this new approach.  Federal officials also explain the new policy, why they are pursuing it, and how it will work in this video of a web event.

Health Policy News

  • HHS has extended the open enrollment period for people seeking health insurance on the federally facilitated marketplace and has extended the scope of services provided by

Federal Health Policy Update for Friday, August 13

The following is the latest health policy news from the federal government as of 1:30 p.m. on Friday, August 13.  Some of the language used below is taken directly from government documents.

Food and Drug Administration

COVID-19

  • The FDA has amended the emergency use authorizations for both the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to authorize administering an additional dose of those vaccines to certain immunocompromised individuals, including solid organ transplant recipients and those who are diagnosed with conditions that are considered to have an equivalent level of immunocompromise.
  • The FDA has revised its emergency use authorization for the monoclonal antibody REGEN-COV (casirivimab and imdevimab, administered together) to add an authorization of REGEN-COV for emergency use as post-exposure prophylaxis (prevention) for COVID-19 in adults and pediatric individuals (12 years of age and older weighing at least 40 kilograms) who are at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death.  Learn more here.

The White House

Federal Health Policy Update for Thursday, July 22

The following is the latest health policy news from the federal government as of 2:45 p.m. on Thursday, July 22.  Some of the language used below is taken directly from government documents.

White House

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Health Policy News

  • CMS has published its proposed calendar year 2022 Medicare outpatient prospective payment system regulation.  Among other subjects, the proposed regulation addresses hospital outpatient and ambulatory surgery center payment rates, hospital price transparency, the section 340B prescription drug discount program, changes in the inpatient-only list and ambulatory surgery center covered procedures list, changes in the hospital outpatient and surgery center quality reporting programs, the newly created rural emergency hospital provider type, the Radiation Oncology Model, temporary flexibilities implemented to facilitate the response to COVID-19, and more.  Stakeholder comments are due by September 17.  Learn more from the following resources.
  • CMS’s Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation has updated the web page of its Radiation Oncology Model to reflect changes

Federal Health Policy Update for Friday, July 9

The following is the latest health policy news from the federal government as of 2:45 p.m. on Friday, July 9.  Some of the language used below is taken directly from government documents.

White House

President Biden has issued an executive order “…to promote competition in the American economy, which will lower prices for families, increase wages for workers, and promote innovation and even faster economic growth.”  Among other things, the executive order calls for closer scrutiny of corporate consolidation, maintaining that such consolidation results in a “…lack of competition [that] drives up prices for consumers.  As fewer large players have controlled more of the market, mark-ups (charges over cost) have tripled.  Families are paying higher prices for necessities – things like prescription drugs, hearing aids, and internet service.”  The order also includes a provision that “… enforcement should focus in particular on labor markets, agricultural markets, healthcare markets (which includes prescription drugs, hospital consolidation, and insurance), and the tech sector.”

In a section on hospitals, the order notes that

Hospital consolidation has left many areas, especially rural communities, without good options for convenient and affordable healthcare service.  Thanks to unchecked mergers, the ten largest healthcare systems now control a quarter of the market.  Since 2010, 139 rural hospitals have shuttered, including a high of

Vaccination Rates Low Among Medicaid Recipients

Individuals enrolled in Medicaid are less likely to have received COVID-19 vaccines than the population as a whole, according to a recently published report.

Among the possible reasons for this low rate, observers speculate, is greater vaccine hesitancy among low-income individuals (as identified in a nation-wide survey), less flexible work schedules, and economic barriers such as lack of transportation or child care.

Learn more about the extent of the problem around the country and what state Medicaid programs are doing to encourage more Medicaid beneficiaries to roll up their sleeves and get vaccinated in the Roll Call article “Medicaid beneficiaries less likely to get COVID-19 shots.”