Archive for Medicaid

 

Medicaid Expansion Helping Diabetics

The Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion has led to a 40 percent increase in the number of prescriptions for diabetes medicine filled in the 30 states that expanded their Medicaid programs.

Meanwhile, there was no change in the number of diabetes-related prescriptions filled in states that did not expand their Medicaid programs.

This is considered important because it suggests that many low-income people who either could not afford their diabetes medicine or whose illness was undiagnosed are now being treated for the disease – a significant development because every diabetic who is treated for the condition represents a cost savings of $6394 a year, mostly because of fewer hospitalizations.

Learn more about how Medicaid expansion is improving the health of low-income people with diabetes and lowering health care spending in this California Healthline report or go here to see the Health Affairs study “Medicaid Eligibility Expansions May Address Gaps in Access to Diabetes Medications” on which that report is based.…

Battle Over Medicaid Work Requirements Not Over

The Secretary of Health and Human Services is not accepting a recent federal court ruling as the final word on Medicaid work requirements.

Although the court ruled against a federally approved plan to permit the state of Kentucky to implement a work requirement for some able-bodied Medicaid recipients, HHS Secretary Alex Azar insists that his department will continue to support work requirements for Medicaid beneficiaries.

Azar told a Heritage Foundation audience that

We suffered one blow in district court in litigation, but we are undeterred.  We’re proceeding forward…We’re fully committed to work requirements and community participation in the Medicaid program…we will continue to litigate, we will continue to approve plans, we will continue to work with states.  We are moving forward.

Learn more about the ruling against Kentucky’s Medicaid work requirement, which was approved by HHS, and the federal government’s determination to enable states to impose such requirements in this Washington Post article.…

Pay Raise Didn’t Lead More Docs to Participate in Medicaid

The temporary rate increase that the Affordable Care Act provided as means of encouraging more doctors to serve Medicaid patients did not work, according to two new studies published in the journal Health Affairs.

According to the studies, the increase in the number of physicians who decided to begin serving Medicaid patients as a result of the fee increase was negligible.

Among the reasons the studies’ authors offer for the lack of growth in the participation of doctors are the limited nature of the pay raise and the documentation required to receive it.

Despite this, the authors note, access to care did improve as a result of the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion.

Learn more about the studies, their results, and their significance by going here to see the Health Affairs report “No Association Found Between The Medicaid Primary Care Fee Bump And Physician-Reported Participation In Medicaid and here for the study “Physicians’ Participation In Medicaid Increased Only Slightly Following Expansion.”…

CMS: Not Done With Medicaid Work Requirements

Despite the ruling of a federal court that Kentucky’s new Medicaid work requirement violates federal law, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has not ruled out approving future requests from state governments to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients.

Or so asserted CMS administrator Seema Verma at a recent health care event in Washington, D.C.

The Washington Examiner reports that at that event, Verma said that

We are looking at what the court said.  We want to be respectful of the court’s decision while trying to push ahead with our policy and our goals.

CMS currently has applications from eight states to establish new Medicaid work requirements.

Learn more about the legal obstacles Medicaid work requirements have encountered and how CMS views those obstacles in this Washington Examiner article.

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Medicaid Managed Care Plans Suffer High Physician Turnover

The physician networks developed by Medicaid managed care plans suffer from a degree of turnover that threatens continuity of care for their members.

While the number of Medicaid managed care plans using so-called narrow networks of providers declined by more than a third between 2010 and 2015, physician turnover is higher in those narrow network plans:  three percentage points higher after one year and 20 percentage points higher after five years than the networks of plans that do not employ narrow networks.

Collectively, Medicaid managed care plans experienced physician turnover of 12 percent a year from 2010 to 2015.

Learn more about physician turnover in Medicaid managed care plans in the Health Affairs study “Network Optimization And The Continuity Of Physicians In Medicaid Managed Care,” which can be found here.

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