Archive for Medicaid managed care

 

Medicaid MCOs Skimping on Care?

Medicaid MCOs may be skimping on care, according to a recent Kaiser Health News report.

According to Kaiser, for-profit companies that sub-contract with Medicaid managed care organizations to review requests for services often deny care to Medicaid patients to save money for the MCOs that employ them and to benefit themselves financially.

The Kaiser article presents examples of companies that have been identified engaging in such practices, explains how they go about their work, and outlines the dangers to Medicaid recipients posed by such practices.

Learn more in the Kaiser Health News article “Coverage Denied: Medicaid Patients Suffer As Layers Of Private Companies Profit.”

CMS Proposes New Medicaid Managed Care Regulation

Just two years after a major overhaul of Medicaid managed care regulations, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is again proposing changes in how the federal government regulates the delivery of managed care services to Medicaid beneficiaries.

Under the newly proposed regulation, states would:

  • be free to implement more changes in their managed care programs without seeking federal permission;
  • have slightly more flexibility in how supplemental payments are made to hospitals through managed care plans and implement some such changes without federal approval;
  • be permitted to redefine what constitutes an adequate provider network for managed care plans; and
  • not be required to publicize beneficiary grievance and appeals processes as prominently as they currently do.

Overall, the proposed regulation appears to help managed care insurers a great deal, states a little, and hospitals barely at all.

Stakeholders have until January 14 to submit formal comments about the proposal to CMS.

To learn more about the proposed Medicaid managed care regulation, go here to see CMS’s news release presenting the regulation, go here to see a more detailed CMS fact sheet, and go here to see the proposed regulation itself.…

Verma Speaks at Medicaid Managed Care Summit

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services administrator Seema Verma recently addressed the Medicaid Managed Care Summit, which was held in Washington, D.C.

Ms. Verma’s speech focused on four major areas:

  • Empowering states to function as laboratories for innovation by giving them the flexibility to introduce changes that work best for their own citizens.
  • Developing Medicaid and CHIP scorecards that present data on health outcomes, quality metrics, and CMS’s administrative performance.
  • Improving Medicaid program integrity, including through “…targeted audits to ensure that provider claims for actual health care spending match what the [Medicaid managed care] health plans are reporting financially.”
  • Strengthening CMS’s use of data in Medicaid oversight.

See Ms. Verma’s complete remarks here.…

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met recently in Washington, D.C. to review a number of Medicaid- and CHIP-related issues.

MACPAC members heard presentations on and discussed the following issues:

Find outlines of these subjects and additional materials by clicking the links above and go here for a transcript of the two days of public meetings.

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide array of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  While its recommendations are binding on neither the administration nor Congress, MACPAC’s work is highly influential and often finds its way into future Medicaid and CHIP policy.

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GAO Looks at Medicaid Managed Care Spending

The federal government should do more to help states ensure the accuracy and integrity of their payments to Medicaid managed care organizations and the payments those Medicaid managed care organizations make to health care providers.

This is the conclusion reached in a new study of Medicaid managed care performed by the U.S. Government Accountability Office at the request of the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs.

The GAO study identified six payment risks among various transactions between state governments, Medicaid managed care organizations, and health care providers.  The two biggest risks, the GAO concluded, were:

  1. incorrect fee-for-service payments from MCOs, where the MCO paid providers for improper claims, such as claims for services not provided; and
  2. inaccurate state payments to MCOs resulting from using data that are not accurate or including costs that should be excluded in setting payment rates.

The GAO traces some of these problems to a delay in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ planned Medicaid managed care guidance to states; limited implementation of new auditing practices CMS introduced in 2016; and CMS’s failure to account for overpayments to providers when it reviews state capitation rates for Medicaid …