Archive for Affordable Care Act

 

Federal Health Policy Update for Monday, June 28

The following is the latest health policy news from the federal government as of 2:30 p.m. on Monday, June 28.  Some of the language used below is taken directly from government documents.

Supreme Court Decision in Affordable Care Act Case

  • The Supreme Court has declined to hear an appeal of a case in which insurers unsuccessfully sued to recover reductions in their Affordable Care Act federal cost-sharing reduction payments.

White House

Department of Health and Human Services

COVID-19

  • HHS and the FDA have paused all distribution of bamlanivimab and etesevimab together and etesevimab alone, to pair with existing supply of bamlanivimab, on a national basis until further notice.  In addition, the FDA has recommended that health care providers nation-wide use alternative authorized monoclonal antibody therapies and not use bamlanivimab and etesevimab administered together at this time.  Learn more about why the agencies have taken this action and what they propose as alternatives from this message distributed by HHS’s Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response,
  • HHS’s Office of the Inspector General has published a

Federal Health Policy Update for Monday, June 21

The following is the latest health policy news from the federal government as of 2:15 p.m. on Monday, June 21.  Some of the language used below is taken directly from government documents.

Supreme Court Decision in Affordable Care Act Challenge

  • The Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act in the California v. Texas case by a 7-2 vote in which the court concluded that the plaintiffs did not have standing to pursue the matter because they were not directly harmed.  See the court’s opinion here.

White House

Department of Health and Human Services

COVID-19

  • HHS’s Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) has suspended distribution of the monoclonal antibodies bamlanivimab/etesevimab in Rhode Island because of the rising prevalence in that state of the COVID-19 P.1 (Gamma) variant (first identified in Brazil) and the B.1.351 (Beta) variant (first identified in South Africa) and the relative ineffectiveness of these therapies in fighting these variants.  ASPR has already suspended distribution of these monoclonal antibodies in Arizona, California, Florida, Indiana, Oregon, Washington, Illinois,

Feds Rescind Texas Medicaid Waiver

A federal Medicaid waiver approved for the state of Texas in the waning days of the Trump administration has been rescinded by the Biden administration.

The waiver called for spending as much as $100 billion for health care for low-income Texans over the next ten years.

Officially, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services revoked the waiver on technical grounds, maintaining that the agency “… erred in exempting the state from the normal public notice process – a critical priority for soliciting stakeholder feedback and ensuring public awareness.”  The Washington Post, however, reports that according to two unnamed federal health officials, the decision was “… an effort to push state officials toward accepting the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion, which would cover more low-income residents….”

According to the Post, “Health advocates had described that waiver as an effort to work around the federal Medicaid expansion by setting up alternate funding to help cover the costs of uninsured patients.” The Post notes that the Biden administration has been urging Texas and the other 11 states that have not expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care to do so.

Learn more about the CMS decision to rescind the Texas …

Federal Health Policy Update for Wednesday, March 24

Beginning today, DeBrunner & Associates is expanding its regular updates to encompass a broader scope of federal health policy endeavors to include other matters of importance to providers.  Feel free to share this newsletter with others in your organization or to send us the email addresses of those you think might be interested and we will send it directly to them.

The following is the latest such information from the federal government as of 2:45 p.m. on Wednesday, March 24.

Congress

The temporary delay of implementation of the Medicare two percent sequester expires at the end of the month and amid considerable advocacy by the health care community, Congress is considering extending this delay.  Last week the House passed a bill that would extend the current moratorium through December 31, 2021 and would waive “PAYGO” rules that apply to the American Rescue Plan Act that would necessitate an additional two percent sequester on Medicare payments starting in January, which would be added to the existing sequester to result in a four percent sequester. The Senate will not take up the House bill but could take up S. 748, which would extend the current moratorium for the duration of the COVID-19 …

ACA Medicaid Expansion Cut Young Adult Uninsurance in Half

The number of uninsured young adults fell nearly 50 percent after the Affordable Care Act authorized states to expand their Medicaid programs, a new study has found.

According to the Urban Institute, the uninsured rate among people between the ages of 19 and 25 fell from 30.2 percent to 16 percent between 2011 and 2018, with most of the decline coming between 2013 and 2016, when the first round of states expanded their Medicaid programs.

The decline in the rate of uninsured young adults mirrored declines in the overall U.S. uninsured rate, which fell from 27.7 percent to 11.3 percent in states that expanded their Medicaid programs.

Learn more about how implementation of the Affordable Care Act affected the insurance status of young adults in the Urban Institute report “Impacts of the ACA’s Medicaid Expansion on Health Insurance Coverage and Health Care Access Among Young Adults.”…