Archive for Affordable Care Act

 

Medicaid Expansion Helping Diabetics

The Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion has led to a 40 percent increase in the number of prescriptions for diabetes medicine filled in the 30 states that expanded their Medicaid programs.

Meanwhile, there was no change in the number of diabetes-related prescriptions filled in states that did not expand their Medicaid programs.

This is considered important because it suggests that many low-income people who either could not afford their diabetes medicine or whose illness was undiagnosed are now being treated for the disease – a significant development because every diabetic who is treated for the condition represents a cost savings of $6394 a year, mostly because of fewer hospitalizations.

Learn more about how Medicaid expansion is improving the health of low-income people with diabetes and lowering health care spending in this California Healthline report or go here to see the Health Affairs study “Medicaid Eligibility Expansions May Address Gaps in Access to Diabetes Medications” on which that report is based.…

Pay Raise Didn’t Lead More Docs to Participate in Medicaid

The temporary rate increase that the Affordable Care Act provided as means of encouraging more doctors to serve Medicaid patients did not work, according to two new studies published in the journal Health Affairs.

According to the studies, the increase in the number of physicians who decided to begin serving Medicaid patients as a result of the fee increase was negligible.

Among the reasons the studies’ authors offer for the lack of growth in the participation of doctors are the limited nature of the pay raise and the documentation required to receive it.

Despite this, the authors note, access to care did improve as a result of the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion.

Learn more about the studies, their results, and their significance by going here to see the Health Affairs report “No Association Found Between The Medicaid Primary Care Fee Bump And Physician-Reported Participation In Medicaid and here for the study “Physicians’ Participation In Medicaid Increased Only Slightly Following Expansion.”…

Hospital Government Payment Losses Could Reach $218 Billion by 2028

A recent study concluded that hospitals can expect to lose about $218 billion in federal Medicare and Medicaid payments between 2010, when the latest round of major cuts began, and 2028.

Among those cuts cited in the study, which was commissioned by the American Hospital Association and the Federation of American Hospitals, are:

  • $79 billion for DRG documentation and coding adjustments
  • $73 billion for Medicare sequestration
  • $26 billion for Medicaid disproportionate share payments (Medicaid DSH)
  • $11 billion in cuts associated with the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012

Other cuts came, or will be coming, through regulatory changes, the introduction of value-based payment programs, and other means.

Learn more about these cuts and their potential implications in this Healthcare Dive story.

 …

Verdict: Medicaid Expansion Improved Care and Access

A new review of studies published since the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion has concluded that expansion improved care, access to care, and coverage in states that expanded their Medicaid programs.

Among the improvements cited by studies are:

  • greater use of primary care
  • more preventive health visits
  • more behavioral health care
  • shorter hospital stays
  • fewer avoidable hospital admissions
  • reduced access problems
  • reduced reliance on hospital ERs as a primary source of care
  • improved monitoring and compliance rates for patients with diabetes and hypertension
  • higher rates of screening for prostate cancer and Pap smears

In addition, hospitals provided less uncompensated care and had better margins.

Learn more in the Health Affairs study “The Effects Of Medicaid Expansion Under The ACA:  A Systematic Review,” which can be found here, or go here for a Healthcare Dive summary of the study.…

Helping Safety-Net Hospitals Help Their Patients

A new report published on the Health Affairs Blog describes the continuing challenges safety-net hospitals face and offers suggestions for helping them meet those challenges.

The challenges, according to the report, are the virtual elimination of the Affordable Care Act’s individual health insurance mandate; the continued decline in the amount of Medicare disproportionate share hospital money (Medicare DSH) provided to safety-net hospitals; and hospital closures that shift more of the burden for caring for uninsured patients onto a smaller pool of safety-net hospitals.  The result is under-served patients and new financial risks for the hospitals that remain after some safety-net hospitals close because of the large amounts of uncompensated care those hospitals continue to provide.

To address these challenges, the report offers three potential solutions:

  • Congress should revisit the Medicare DSH cuts.
  • States should target their DSH money to the hospitals providing the most uncompensated care.
  • Non-profit non-safety-net hospitals that stabilize uninsured emergency patients and then direct them to safety-net hospitals should be required to play a longer-term role in the care of such patients as part of their required community benefit or risk losing their tax-exempt status.

Learn more about the challenges safety-net hospitals continue to face and some …