Archive for Medicaid regulations

 

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission, a non-partisan legislative branch agency that advises Congress, the administration, and the states on Medicaid and CHIP issues, met publicly in Washington, D.C. last week.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of its two days of meetings.

The April 2018 meeting began with session on social determinants of health. Panelists Jocelyn Guyer of Manatt Health Solutions, Arlene Ash of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Kevin Moore of UnitedHealthcare Community & State discussed state approaches to financing social interventions through Medicaid. In its second morning session, the Commission reviewed a draft chapter of the June 2018 Report to Congress on Medicaid and CHIP on the adequacy of the care delivery system for substance use disorders (SUDs) with a special focus on opioid use disorders.

In the afternoon, the Commission discussed the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) March 2018 proposed rule changing the process by which states verify that Medicaid fee-for-service provider payment is sufficient to ensure access to care and agreed to submit comments to the agency. The first day of the meeting concluded with a review of the draft June chapter describing the status of managed long-term services

GAO: CMS Needs to Do Better Job on Demonstration Evaluations

The federal government needs to do a better job of evaluating Medicaid demonstration programs, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

Demonstration programs, on which the federal government spends more than $300 billion a year, exempt states from selected federal Medicaid requirements and regulations so they can test new approaches to providing and paying for care for their Medicaid population.  As part of waiving these requirements, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services requires the states to perform or commission evaluations of the effectiveness of those new approaches.

According to a new GAO study, however, those reports are not always performed in a timely manner, are sometimes too limited in scope, and their results are not sufficiently publicized so that others may learn lessons from the demonstration.  The GAO recommended that CMS establish written procedures for such matter and CMS agreed with this recommendation.

Learn more about the GAO’s review of Medicaid demonstration program evaluations in the GAO report Medicaid Demonstrations:  Evaluations Yielded Limited Results, Underscoring Need for Changes to Federal Policies and Procedures, which can be found here.…

Medicaid Changes: More Than Just Work Requirements Coming?

While the green light for state applications to impose work requirements on their Medicaid recipients is receiving all of the attention, the Trump administration has issued guidance that appears to pave the way for other major changes in the Medicaid program as well.

Specifically, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has issued guidance that will enable states to pursue section 1115 waivers to test different ways of serving Medicaid patients that are otherwise not permitted under federal Medicaid law, including:

  • establishing time limits on how many months or years individuals may be enrolled in Medicaid;
  • locking out for a specified period of time Medicaid recipients who have not gone through annual eligibility redetermination or have failed to pay Medicaid premiums;
  • prohibiting hospitals from making presumptive eligibility determinations when they encounter new, low-income patients who are not enrolled in Medicaid at the time;
  • tightening their eligibility requirements;
  • excluding family planning providers like Planned Parenthood; and
  • establishing closed drug formularies for their Medicaid population.

Learn more about how the foundation has been laid for such changes if states are so inclined to pursue them and the implications of such changes if they are implemented in the article “State Waivers as a …

Medicare Penalizes Hospitals for Avoidable Injuries, Illnesses

Medicare is reducing payments to 751 hospitals because of the high rate at which their patients have suffered avoidable injuries and illnesses while in the hospital.

The penalties come under Medicare’s Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program, which was established by the Affordable Care Act.

Among the penalized hospitals,

  • more than half were penalized last year as well
  • 115 are academic medical centers – about one-third of all such facilities
  • more than one-third of all safety-net hospitals were penalized

Learn more about the program, the penalties, and why the penalties were assessed in this Kaiser Health News report.…

Hospitals Improving on Medicare Value-Based Measures

U.S. hospitals continue to improve their performance under Medicare’s value-based purchasing program.

In FY 2018, 57 percent of hospitals will receive Medicare bonuses from the program, up from 55 percent in FY 2017.  Bonuses are generally small but for some hospitals will be more than three percent.  Roughly half of all hospitals will experience changes in their Medicare base rates.  The worst performers will see their payments decline 1.65 percent.

In FY 2018, hospitals that succeed in the program will share $1.9 billion in bonus payments.  Funding for those payments in this budget-neutral program comes from CMS withholding two percent of hospital inpatient payments to create the bonus pool.

Learn more about FY 2018 payments under the Medicare value-based purchasing program in this Healthcare Finance News article or go here for links to the raw CMS data about the program.…